Tag Archives: Back Cover Copy

17.5: The Promise of the Brand

Your Hosts: Howard Tayler, Kaela RiveraSandra Tayler, and Megan Lloyd

Your brand—your name, the cover art for your book, and even the typeface for the title—set expectations for the book’s contents. That advice about not judging a book by its cover? It’s lovely in theory, but in practice, that’s just not how it works.

In this episode we’ll talk about how your brand gets defined, and how you can work with those elements to correctly set expectations regarding your work.

Liner Notes: We’ve done several episodes about branding. 14.34 is particularly good.

Credits: This episode was recorded by Marshall Carr, Jr., and mastered by Alex Jackson

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Describe the perfect cover for your work-in-progress. What is the right typeface for your brand?

Illuminae, by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff

16.27: Nobody Wants to Read a Book

Your Hosts: DongWon Song, Mary Robinette Kowal, Dan Wells, and Howard Tayler

Our controversial episode title comes to us via John Schwarzwelder, and it points up nicely the importance of today’s topic, which is first lines, first pages, and how we set about convincing people (who may or may not want to read a book) to read OUR book.

Credits: This episode was recorded by Marshall Carr, Jr., and mastered by Alex Jackson

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Homework: read the first pages of the last three books you read. Take notes on what you find exciting about them. What kept you reading? What would make you pause?

The Last Watch, by J.S. Dewes

Writing Excuses 9.47: Conversation With a Bookseller

Bookseller Sara Glassman joined us at the Out of Excuses Workshop and Retreat to talk to us about her perspective on this industry, with an eye to the things that make it easy for her to put a book in a customer’s hands. We talk about back cover copy, covers, query letters, signings, and what booksellers look for on page one.

(Note: Brandon refers to a book of the week pitch that Sara made for us. We needed to run this episode out of order, so you’ll get Sara’s pitch for that book sometime next year.)

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Have three of your friends to send you a random photograph of an object. Use each object in the first 13 lines of your story.

The Rook, by Daniel O’Malley, narrated by Susan Duerden