13.40: Fixing Character Problems, Part I

Your Hosts: Brandon, Mary, Dan, and Howard

This is the first of two episodes in which we’ll talk about how we, your hosts, fix the problems we’ve identified with the characters in our work.

Credits: this episode was recorded by Dan Thompson and mastered by Alex Jackson

Play

Take your very favorite character that you’ve created, and write a couple of scenes in which you break them by writing them wrong.

Heroine Complex, by Sarah Kuhn

5 thoughts on “13.40: Fixing Character Problems, Part I”

  1. /!\ EVERYONE WATCH OUT FOR THE SPOILER – SKIP 13:55-14:00 IF YOU HAVE NOT READ DAN WELLS’ SERIAL KILLER BOOKS /!\

    Now I’m going to have to wait years before I can read Dan’s books without remembering that this character dies. -_-

  2. I was driving to work and listening to this episode. When the prompt came on, I mentally sorted through my characters, and picked the perfect one, and then Howard twisted the prompt. I started shouting “No! No! Noooo!” when he said to purposely break my character.

    I get that the best way to see how something works is to take it apart, but this one hurts.

  3. Predictability was a problem John Sheridan had in the 90s Sci-Fi series Babylon 5. As the commander of the Babylon 5 station, he had a set role that predetermined a lot of his actions. The buildup to and playing out of the Shadow War plotline pretty much dominated the character’s screen time rendering him one-note.

    Sheridan’s one diversion was his relationship with Delenn, which was largely sucked into his role or her role, giving limited relief. He didn’t get many iconic scenes to bring him to life as Londo or G’Kar did.

  4. In the first part of this two-parter, our original quartet, Brandon, Mary, Dan, and Howard, take a look at how to fix up a boring character. Digging into “make them interesting,” they talk about what to think about, and how pushing on a character can be rewarding. Lots of details, available now in the transcript in the archives and over here:

    https://wetranscripts.dreamwidth.org/148533.html

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